Resources For Dental Professionals

The Science

Neutralizing plaque acids

Chewing sugarfree gum for 20 minutes after meals and snacks can help patients to neutralize plaque acid. The saliva stimulated by chewing gum can help reverse the fall of pH caused by plaque bacteria following the consumption of sugars and starches. This reversal is due to the increased buffering effect of higher levels of bicarbonate found in stimulated saliva. Stimulated saliva's buffering effect also can help to reduce erosion of tooth enamel.

Published research

1. Effect of time and duration of sorbitol gum chewing on plaque acidogenicity.
Park KK, Schemehorn BR, Stookey GK. Ped Dent. 1993; 15(3): 197-202.
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2. pH changes in plaque after eating snacks and meals, and their modification by chewing sugared or sugar-free gum.
Manning RH, Edgar WM. Br Dent J. 1993; 174: 241-244.
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3. A modified plaque pH telemetry method.
Maiwald HJ, Frohlich S. J Clin Dent. 1992; 3(3): 79-82.
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4. Effect of gum chewing on the pH of dental plaque.
Frohlich S, Maiwald HJ, Flowerdew G. J Clin Dent. 1992; 3(3): 75-78.
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5. The effect of chewing sorbitol-sweetened gum on salivary flow and cemental plaque pH in subjects with low salivary flow.
Abelson DC, Barton S, Mandel ID. J Clin Dent. 1990; II(1): 3-5.
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6. The impact of chewing sugarless gum on the acidogenicity of fast-food meals.
Park KK, Schemehorn BR, Bolton JW, Stookey GK. Am J Dent Res. 1990; 3(6): 231-235.
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7. Effect of sorbitol, xylitol, and xylitol/sorbitol chewing gums on dental plaque.
Söderling E, Mäkinen KK, Chen CY, Pape HR Jr, Loesche W, Mäkinen PL. Caries Res. 1989; 23(5): 378-384.
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8. Clinical study to evaluate the effects of three marketed sugarless chewing gum products on plaque pH, pCa, and swallowing rates.
Yankell SL, Emling RC. J Clin Dent. 1989; 1(3): 70-74.
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9. Clinical effects on plaque pH, pCa, and swallowing rates from chewing a flavored or unflavored chewing gum.
Yankell SL, Emling RC. J Clin Dent. 1988; 1(2): 51-53.
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10. Effects of chewing sorbitol gum on human salivary and interproximal plaque pH.
Jensen ME. J Clin Dent. 1988; 1(1): 6-27.
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11. Sorbitol gum in xerostomics: the effect on dental plaque pH and salivary flow rates.
Markovic N, Abelson DC, Mandel ID. Gero. 1988; 7(2): 71-75.
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12. Responses of interproximal plaque pH to snack foods and effect of chewing sorbitol-containing gum.
Jensen ME. J Am Dent Assoc. 1986; 113: 262-266.
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13. Effect of chewing gums containing xylitol, sorbitol or a mixture of xylitol and sorbitol on plaque formation, pH changes and acid production in human dental plaque.
Topitsoglou V, Birkhed D, Larsson L-A, Frostell G. Caries Res. 1983; 17: 369-378.
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WOHP

WOHP

WOHP has supported independent clinical research into the benefits of chewing gum for more than 25 years.

Economic benefits of chewing

Economic benefits of chewing

Global health economic data suggests that increasing sugar-free gum consumption could reduce global dental expenditures from treating tooth decay by US$4.1 billion a year. Download Infographic (PDF) and Economic Benefits Study (PDF)

The Science

The Science

Independent research supported by Wrigley funding has continued to have an impact on the oral care arena for nearly 90 years.